Residential Conversion Complete at The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Logan Square, Center City

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Credit: Pearl PropertiesThe Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Credit: Pearl Properties

A recent site visit by Philadelphia YIMBY revealed that residential conversion work appears to be complete at The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Logan Square, Center City. The 267-foot-tall, 27-story high-rise was built in 1964 and previously known as Embassy Suites Philadelphia Center City. The development was gradually overhauled over the course of the past year from hotel into a 288-unit rental apartment building, and upon our site visit the development appeared as complete, with no visible of signs of construction remaining. The Pearl Properties website indicates that the building is currently available for lease.

The Terrace on 18th offers wedge-shaped apartments, a layout resulting from owing to the building’s unique shape, with a balcony in each unit. The 12,500-square-foot amenity package includes a two-story lobby lounge, valet parking, laundry, and more. Rents start at $1,995.

Terrace on 18th Street. Image by Gabe Lui Architectural Renderings

Terrace on 18th Street. Image by Gabe Lui Architectural Renderings

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

The Brutalist-styled high-rise has long been a staple of the Philadelphia skyline. Designed by the architecture firm of Stonorov & Haws, which was also behind local high-rise buildings such as 1300-10 Lombard Street and the Southwark Towers, the structure dates more than two decades older than the iconic Liberty Place skyscrapers and nearly half as old as the rarefied tower of City Hall itself.

Despite its understated appearance and relatively modest height (the setbacked, granite-clad slab of Three Logan Square looms nearly three times as tall directly to the south), the structure is notable for its distinctive appearance. The multi-sided, nearly cylindrical pillar, where flat windowless panels alternate with balcony bays, can hardly be mistaken for any other skyscraper in the city. The building’s presence is amplified by its prominent location on the Parkway, which makes it visible from classic Philadelphia postcard views such as from Love Park looking toward the Philadelphia Art Museum or from the Museum steps looking toward the skyline and City Hall.

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller. December 2021

1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller. December 2021

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Photo by Jamie Meller

Arguably, the building’s decidedly Mid-century exterior aesthetic is quite dated, and not necessarily for the better. On the other hand, this same aesthetic lends it a special charm, where the building is a breath of fresh air among Center City’s seemingly interchangeable rectilinear Modernist office boxes. The building’s appearance is plain, no-frills, and somewhat gritty, yet is nevertheless eye-catching and singular, mirroring a character not dissimilar to that of Philadelphia itself. Similarly, the building’s address of 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway is so patriotic-sounding that it borders on parody, yet it is as distinctively Philadelphian as can be.

As such, although a complete exterior recladding may have yielded a more refined design, ultimately we are glad that the developers opted to keep the appearance of this unlikely skyline staple (as we are glad that they opted to maintain the open-air dining establishment atop the podium, a longtime local favorite). With its new function concealed within a familiar form, The Terrace on 18th will continue to grace classic Philadelphia views for years to come, even as they are augmented by new skyline additions such as the mixed-use Two Cathedral Square tower planned two blocks to the north at 227 North 18th Street.

Two Cathedral Square at 227 North 18th Street. Credit: Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Two Cathedral Square at 227 North 18th Street. Credit: Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Subscribe to YIMBY’s daily e-mail

Follow YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Like YIMBY on Facebook
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

.

6 Comments on "Residential Conversion Complete at The Terrace on 18th at 1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Logan Square, Center City"

  1. At a recent NCO meeting, there was discussion that the signage on the Terrace was larger than allowed. If you look around that portion of the Parkway, other signage is smaller and placed lower on the building. I do not know if there is a next step in addressing that issue. Regardless, It is nice to have the apartments and the new brew pub addition to the neighborhood.

  2. It is nice to have residential conversion complete and the addition of Federal Doughnuts and Victory, however it appears that no provisions were made to handle the trash that is generated. The now have dumpsters lined up in cherry street where cabs used to wait. they smell and are at times overflowing. what an unsightly mess

  3. You fail to note that this was originally an apartment building, The Plaza Apartments. John B (Jack) Kelly had one of the penthouses. Indeed, we lived there from 1972-76. Was a great location even back then when the former Four Seasons was an empty lot and long before the Bell Atlantic Tower, Two Logan, etc.

  4. This place is definitely haunted.

  5. I think these would have been better served with a re-clad. Reminds me of that dump flea bag blood stained sheet hotel in south Philly.

  6. Definitely has that housing project and Ocean City hotel vibe as well. The price point is the same as a new modern building so I don’t see this as being successfull. People only use apartment balconies for smoking and jumping.

    Its pretty obvious I have always hated this building.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*