YIMBY Looks at Recently Completed Riverwalk North at 60 North 23rd Street in Center City West

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property GroupRiverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk, also known as Riverwalk Philly, is a mixed-use development that rises at 60 North 23rd Street in Center City West (alternately Logan Square). Designed by Gensler and developed and built by the PMC Property Group, the project is situated by the Schuylkill River waterfront consists of two high-rises that will hold a total of 711 rental units. The 315-foot-tall, 28-story, 331-unit Riverwalk North is already open for residents, while the 362-foot-tall, 32-story, 380-unit south tower is still under construction. Today, Philadelphia YIMBY takes a look at the development’s amenities and residences.

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk North at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk North at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

The tower slab pair is styled in a sleek Modernist aesthetic with crisply defined edges and prominent balcony bays. Blue-glass exteriors alternate between sheer smooth surfaces and gently rippling facades, channeling an aesthetic reminiscent of the adjacent river. The rather conservative, rectilinear forms are made more interesting by their staggered and gently angled position in relation to one another. As such, the composition creates a dynamic effect that creates varying juxtapositions depending on the viewer’s location.

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk South at 60 North 23rd Street. Photo by Jamie Meller

Riverwalk South at 60 North 23rd Street. Photo by Jamie Meller

Upon full completion, the pet-friendly development will offer an amenity suite that spans around 50,000 square feet. The complex offers a round-the-clock front desk attendant, indoor and outdoor resident lounge space, an outdoor picnic patio, co-working areas and private office pods, and on-site pet care. The fitness component includes a gym, sports courts (basketball, volleyball, paddle tennis, platform tennis, badminton, squash, and soccer), a cycling studio, yoga and Pilates studios, and an infinity pool with sun terraces.

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

The property includes on-site Starbucks and Sweetgreen shops, as well as delivery service from the Giant supermarket located on the lower levels. The complex also offers bicycle storage, a bike share program, and parking with car charging (for an additional fee).

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Riverwalk at 60 North 23rd Street. Credit: PMC Property Group

Units range from 347-square-foot studios (called “microunits”) to 1,245-square-foot two-bedroom apartments, with rents ranging from $1,655 to $4,420 per month. Although listings are currently available for both towers, only rentals at Riverwalk North are available for occupancy, as the south tower is currently under construction. Apartments feature floor-to-ceiling windows, solar shades, hardwood floors, granite kitchen countertops (some with waterfall islands), dishwashers, and washers/dryers. Some units also offer balconies.

Rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Floor plan of a rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Floor plan of a rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Floor plan of a rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Floor plan of a rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Floor plan of a rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

Floor plan of a rental apartment at Riverwalk. Credit: PMC Property Group

In Philadelphia’s early days, the busy ports and adjacent industrial neighborhoods along the Delaware and Schuylkill provided an economic lifeline to the city that has consistently ranked among the nation’s largest. By our time, the city’s central districts have largely shifted to a service economy, and as such are embracing its waterfront as a residential destination. Within this current paradigm, high-density, high-rise developments such as Riverwalk are key to maximizing the use of this precious yet limited public resource.

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3 Comments on "YIMBY Looks at Recently Completed Riverwalk North at 60 North 23rd Street in Center City West"

  1. The demographics of the people in the pool renderings are pretty white woman and 1 guy in a speedo. I heard they have someone on staff to pick up all the dead birds before residents wake up.

  2. Bonnie Hammond | January 31, 2022 at 7:16 am | Reply

    These properties are beautiful but are they building anything affordable for the 55+ low income seniors that make up over half the work force

  3. I read somewhere that the flooding issues could have been avoided but
    the project would be delayed and the overall price increase.
    I think I read it from Inga Saffron’s review of the project in the Philadelphia Inquirer when the project was first proposed. The CDR(Civic Design Review Board) had tried to address the flooding issue but the developers didn’t want to spend the money to address the possible flooding of the Schuykill River. I watched while they were digging the foundations and I thought the flooding would be a serious problem. Who anticipated that there would be a once in a 100-year flood?

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